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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 939 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Oct 7, 2012 8:00am PDT
with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
SFGTV2
Oct 9, 2012 2:30am PDT
the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however,
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 2:30pm PDT
for that. tavis: the fact that we are disinterested in science, as expressed by the under- performing grades of our students in science classes, what is behind that? is it possible to arrest that development? >> there is a concern up and down the chain in the country, and part of it is, yes, we have to get people interested in science from a young age. i get questions from seven-year- olds, which is really exciting. it turns out that people are signing up to be engineering and science majors, but by the time they have graduated, they have dropped. why? what is going on? is it too hard? there is a lot of studying going on there. tavis: this belief, my word, not yours, but this does belief that many americans have one science tells us -- but this disbelief that many americans have on science -- what is behind this abiding disbelief? >> i happen to believe is a matter of not watching enough science television. tavis: [laughs] >> it is where you live. it is who is doing the teaching. is it really that important? yes. science is research. science is innovation. it is our ticket to every bu
MSNBC
Oct 10, 2012 1:00am PDT
heard that gurdon was interested in doing science and that this was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatever of my doing science and any time spent on it would be a total waste of time, both on my part and the part of the person having to teach him. so that terminated my science at school. >> he wins a nobel prize in medicine, but his high school teacher says he shouldn't bother with science. this is science. he's also now provided a picture of his school report card from 1949, which reads in part, quote, his work has been far from satisfactory. several times he's been in trouble because he will not listen but will insist on doing his work in his own way. i believe he has ideas about becoming a scientist is. this is quite ridiculous. it would be a shear waste of time both on his part and those who have to teach him. then he becomes the first scientistist ever to clone an animal. and that report card is now the picture in the dictionary next to the word pown. stories about people who are bad at science do not always end this way. sometimes
CNN
Oct 13, 2012 8:00am PDT
wheeling its way through streets of los angeles to its final home at the california science center. these pictures have been captivating all of us, including our john zarrella, who is somewhere along the route there. john, good morning. this is quite a task, right? they had some pretty tight clearance in some areas getting this thing around. >> oh yeah, they're not done with those tight clearances yet either, randi. we're about halfway between where it started at l.a.x. and the california science center. so endeavor sitting here behind us now outside the old forum where the los angeles lakers used to play. they're a little bit ahead of schedule and i want to bring in stephanie stillson, who works for nasa and has been responsible for preparing all of the shuttle orbiters for their retirement. stephanie, an amazing sight, but you have to be a little bit concerned when you know the narrow clearances that randi was just talking about. >> absolutely. but the self-propelled motorized transports that they're using can move precisely. so it should be able to crab around the trees and thin
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 11:00pm EDT
the various instruments are going to be used. science teams working together for five or ten years or more interpret the data that returns and discuss which of the engineers what is interesting and possible to do next. so, at its heart the story of the planetary exploration today is about the relation of people and robotic spacecraft. machines never actually complex laboratory capable of operating in extreme cold with little power package to handle the vibrations and worked for years without repair. sending the scientific instruments throughout the solar system is one of the great successes of the computer age, and there will surely marked our place in history and science and exploration but these missions also show that we understand how to design machines and organize people so everything fits and that's my story today about the exploration rovers how the design of the spacecraft as you see mer, the organization of people, the software tools and the schedule makes it possible for scientists to work on mars. in the skill of the universe, mars is next door about nine months travel using co
Current
Oct 12, 2012 11:00pm PDT
and the work around, especially when it comes to you know, science, engineer, mathematics, bioengineering you get to see a peek of what the future is, then you get to share that with family members and you make sense of your travels when you see them in the world. >> gavin: you make sense of the world that we're living in. what world are we living in as you travel, and then go through the disruption and the merger of it globallation, you come away optimistic in the world we're living in or concerned. >> i'm not as concerned as far as danger. i remember going to brazil in 2005. brazil was a totally different country in 2005. i remember going to this place in rio de janeiro and i remember going into those slums andand i remember going a couple of months ago in october of last year--transformed. i remember going to india bangalore and it's the silicon valley of india. inner city ten years from now it's not like there is a budget to get these kids up to speed but there is a budget for that semi conductor and for that chipping to faster. as we develop and get kicker with technology, in america it'
MSNBC
Oct 13, 2012 12:00pm PDT
of our leaders in washington still doubting evolution? bill nye the science guy. that's right. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ [ female announcer ] pop in a whole new kind of clean. with tide pods. just one removes more stains than the 6 next leading pacs combined pop in. stand out. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ ♪ >>> good saturday. i'm craig melvin. here's a quick like at some of the top stories making news right now. residents in westminster, colorado, are celebrating the life of jessica ridgeway. she's the 10-year-old girl whose dismembered body was identified yesterday. she was last seen eight days ago wha walking to school. her body was found in a park wednesday six miles from her home. >>> the party boat started to sink last night after sitting something in the san francisco bay near alcatraz. the impact tore
SFGTV2
Oct 9, 2012 2:00am PDT
system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. i
PBS
Oct 12, 2012 11:00pm PDT
a fever. so five years ago, he created the extreme ice survey, combining art and science to tell the story of a planet in peril. risking life and limb, this photographer and filmmaker, mountaineer, author and prophet has gone to the top of the world to show us overwhelming evidence of what we're doing to the environment. his discoveries are in this magnificent new book, "ice: portraits of vanishing glaciers" and in the feature length documentary "chasing ice," soon to be released. here's an excerpt from its trailer. >>> it all started in iceland. i think i'm so certain to get wet i'll take my boots off. i never imagined that you could see glaciers this big disappearing in such a short time. there's a powerful piece of history that's unfolding in these pictures, and i have to go back. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years, shoot every hour as long as it was daylight. that would show you how the landscape is changing. oh, this is the way to travel, my friend. >> we're putting really delicate electronics in the harshest conditions on the planet. it's not the nicest enviro
SFGTV2
Oct 5, 2012 5:30pm PDT
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
ABC
Oct 12, 2012 11:00pm PDT
. they actually haven't paid for the rights to do this. they have been a long sponsor of the california science center. they are getting this opportunity, and it is a pretty spectacular opportunity for them. this could happen in the next matter of moments. and then it will go back on to the carrier. tomorrow there will be more of a journey and they will find the event actual -- the eventual home at the science center. if you ever make it down to southern california check out the science center near usc and you can see the shuttle up close and personal. reporting live, channel 7 news. >> thanks very much. appreciate it. >>> still to come on abc7 news at 11:00, it is official. we will tell you when and where the next giants playoff game will be held. >> and it took more than 50 years, but now a 93-year-old south bay woman finally has her college degree. >> and on-line shopping upgraded. the hot new act that brings your purchases to you within the hour. and coming up on "nightline." >> coming up next on "nightline" a sex scandal in a sleepy town with an exercise instructor, her alleged prostitutio
FOX
Oct 9, 2012 9:00am PDT
science. >> science? >> science is going to get the girls? that's it. >> yeah. >> this is from our friend at household hacker. >> let's turn whiskey. >> water. well sort of. >> why? >> to impress the ladies. already told you. >> i'll do anything. we start with two shot glasses. you fill one to the brim with water, one to the brim with whiskey. and then here comes the tricky part. take a piece of paper or card board and put it over the water or shot glass, flip it over, the glass on top of the whiskey shot glass. >> slowly move the card a bit in and open up the small slit between the glasses. >> there could be some trickle down from the water to the whiskey. >> this is going to be a density experiment that's going to blow your mind. >> all right. >> see what's happening. >> the water is going down into the whiskey. >> and the whiskey goes up where the water was. that's why this is a density experiment. >> see, the water is heavier than the alcohol so it sinks to the bottom of the two glasses. in the process, it displaces the whiskey and forces it up to the top. >> by the end of the trick h
SFGTV
Oct 13, 2012 4:30pm PDT
unified school district has sufficient textbooks or instructional materials in math, science, history, and social science and english arts and including the component of an adopted program and be it further resolved that each has sufficient textbooks or instructional materials in foreign languages and health classes and that the high schools have science, laboratory equipment, available related to the core science classes. >> no public speakers signed up for this. comments from the board? >> seeing none? roll call please. >> thank you, miss ly. >> yes. >> fewer? >> yes. >> maufus >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. >> murase. >> aye. >> norton, wynns. >> aye. >> item m, discussion of other educational issues done tonight, consent calendar resolutions removed at previous meeting, for second reading and action, none tonight. item 0, consent on calendar moved and seconded under section f. roll call please. >> miss ly. yes. >> and miss fewer. >> yes. >> maufus? >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes, except on items k2, and k5. >> thank you. dr. morasi? >> alicia winterstein. >> wynns? >> alicia winterstein.
SFGTV2
Oct 9, 2012 4:30am PDT
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
MSNBC
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm PDT
will give me a chance to have a mini "west wing" reunion. and a member of the science commit me who thinks science is aloif from the pit of hell. and he thinks he's a scientist. also tonight steve mor continue -- martin decided to do his political commercial, one of those guys, steve martin or bob kerrey will join me to explain why steve did that. ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> coming up, mitt romney tried to play a moderate at the debate last week. this week, paul rien's going to give it a shot. he's never played that part before. ryan versus biden is next. former nebraska senator bob kerrey will talk about his race to get back into the senate and how he talked steve martin in to helping him. a republican congress man says the bible teaches us all about society. that's coming up. [ dog 1 ] i am not a vegetarian! yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add pl
SFGTV2
Oct 9, 2012 4:00am PDT
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
FOX
Oct 10, 2012 9:00am EDT
. in fact, this whole day rocks. it is the national 4h science day. it's all about getting kids excited. we'll check in with their brilliant minds coming up. stay with us. let me tell you how i will create 12 million jobs when presidident obama couldn'. first, my energy independence policy means more than three million new jobs. many of them in manufacturing. my tax reform plan to lower rates for the middle class and for small business creates seven million more. and expanding trade, cracking down on china, and improving job training takes us to over 12 million new jobs. i'm mitt romney, and i approve this message. ♪can you feel it? can you feel it? ♪ >> that's the part that we want to hear on the air. i can feel it. i've never been to a game. i never had the pleasure to route for the nats. but i can feel it. >> tucker has been there a few times. yes, i have been there. >> well, i would change that. >> that's more than ah-hah. >> what's the name? >> take on me. >> maybe you need to hear michael come in. listen. here he comes. ♪ can you feel it? ♪ [ laughter ]. >> of course. enjoy.
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 9:00am EDT
>> the next, author and lecturer steven johnson, bestselling science writer talks about the cyberworld, popular culture in computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction natural history of innovation" and "future perfect: the case of progress in a networked age". >> steven johnson, in your newest book "future perfect: the case of progress in a networked age," you use the term pier progressive. what is that? >> guest: my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all-around me. the book is a serious story about people trying to change the world and advance progress and who don't complete refit the existing model that we have between the democrats and republicans and they believe in many ways that the way that the internet was built, the way that the web was built and things like wikipedia were built using collaborative peer network for people and coming together and openly collaborating and building ideas, that is the tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't involve big gove
CNN
Oct 13, 2012 9:00am PDT
spacecraft winding its way through the city, so its final resting place, the california science center. john zarrella and casey wian are covering this story from different vantage points. we'll start with you, john. you're at a staging area where the shuttle is stopping for a public ceremony. some might argue that it seemed like it was at a standstill, going just 2 miles per hour. now it really has stopped, putting the brakes on for this ceremony. >> absolutely. they got here quite a bit early today, ahead of schedule. they've been sitting here a lot longer than they had anticipated and expected. we are at the old forum where the los angeles lakers used to play a little basketball back in the day before they moved. and you know, it gave an opportunity for thousands of people in the englewood area to come out and see the space shuttle. they had a marching band here. they've had music playing. "endeavour" has been sitting there for the better part of an hour. a lot longer than we had anticipated, fredericka. and i am joined by stephanie stillson who works for nasa and has been in charge of pre
LINKTV
Oct 11, 2012 8:00am PDT
. there's a whole science of black body radiation. we won't be getting into that. we talked about this temperature up here. how about like this with-- this is to say if frequency is directly proportional to temperature, then if you double the temperature, what would happen to the frequency of radiation? double. that's what it means when you write two things like these with a proportion. see, there're no square or cube or anything like that. that means one is proportional to the other. we've got that idea a long time ago, yeah? okay. this is double the temperature, double the frequency. well, let's suppose i consider something that's one degree celsius. if something is one degree above freezing, would it be radiating energy? yes. would that energy have a frequency? how about i compare that to radiating at two degrees above celsius? would that be radiating energy? would that energy have a frequency? yes. would that frequency be doubled? no. check your neighbor. yeah. ah. hey, gang. would the temperature be-- would the frequency be doubled? get right to that point. get right to that
FOX
Oct 10, 2012 7:00am EDT
and engineering. >> it is 4h national science day. holly comes to us from chevy chase. >> reporter: two facts stand out here. one, we need to have kids excited about technology. second of all, hh is make -- 4h is making that happen. studies found that kids are more involved when they are involved with 4h. let's talk about the national challenge day. it's been in its fifth year. >> yes. we are happy that you are here to see robot day. there will be everywhere. >> let's talk about the eco bot challenge. it was successful last year, super fun. kids had a lot of problem solving. >> that's what we are trying to do, make science fun. for the kids, we'll take a tooth prush and a vibrate for from a pager and put a battery on and simulate a toxic spill and see how they clean up and do math and science and do math and technology. >> reporter: how do they come up with the challenges each year? >> we put it out to our universities who run the science program. this is out of ohio this year. we put the challenge to them and they desuperintendent this. >> reporter: volunteers are here, helping out. they are
Current
Oct 12, 2012 5:00pm PDT
of course. but it's also because of reason and science. >> life begins at conception. that's the church's judgment. i accept it in my person life. but i refuse to impose it on equally devout christians muslims, jews, i just refuse to impose that on others. >> michael: joining me now is salon.com staff writer irin carmon. this debate, they spent a ton of time on foreign policy, too much time. and then they got in this area of abortion and women's rights. it has not come up that much, and then after after the polls after the debate mitt romney made up a huge amount of ground among women. why are they not focusing more on women especially with a woman moderating the debate last night. >> i was frustrated last week at the presidential debates that obama and the democrats, and obama's campaign has been making a full-throated pitch to women on reproductive rights by pointing out extreme the house republicans have been from which paul ryan comes. how extreme the republican main treatment is on the issue of women's bodies. but obama missed a chance to bring it up last week. he could have made a
KCSMMHZ
Oct 8, 2012 2:30pm PDT
by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
Current
Oct 5, 2012 11:00pm PDT
in the intersection of art and sciences creating creative creativity and technology. beauty and engineering. that's what steve jobs did and that's added value. that came from really caring, not just about profit, but what am i going to add to the flow of history that is really neat and really cool. >> cenk: he talked in those terms of adding to the flow of history? >> absolutely. he was deeply in his--in his whole mindset was now not how do i make the most money but how do i put things back in the flow of history considering all the cool things that have been put in the flow of history that benefited me. >> gavin: do you think the lawsuit and the settlement and the jury verdict against samsung helps or hurts apple in terms of innovation. >> i don't know, but i will say innovation is important to protect it. i argue with that my daughter, get over it dad. it all should be free. no when a kid comes in to apple computer as this kid did many, many years ago and applies for a job and chose in the swipe and that little dock and how you put them in, and that becomes a really cool invention and steve hir
KOFY
Oct 12, 2012 9:00pm PDT
from los angeles international airport to the california science center. may a third of the way on that journey now. top speed is 2 miles an hour again the route is lined with people who have been taking pictures. remarkable sight. certainly a tricky operation. whole thing being overseen by rigging interfere national which is based in alameda. endeavor is parked right now near the iconic randy do nut. landmark giant do nut roof top ornament. familiar to anyone who travels through lax. look at the scene on the streets of los angeles. shilingts being off loaded from its electric hauler and put ton lighter multi-wheel trailer, doing now. toyota tundra will pull the trailer and shuttle across the 4 05 freeway on the way to downtown inglewood. now we show you the route from lax all the way to the california science center. some 12 miles or so. should reach the science center final destination put on display for people to see at 9:00 o'clock tomorrow night. almost exactly 12 hours from now. just amazing day on the streets of l.a. >> more to get to this friday night. comin
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00am EDT
science team. increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. used to be to the extension of data it was left for fund-raising or you could buy vendors our consultants. and now, you know, people will have call them different things but there's basically the core function of a modern campaign to people, especially on the photo site, just crushing and processing data. >> if any of us were to go to the romney campaign or the obama campaign and where to look around the headquarters, how many people, is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago, dozens of people depending i had how you define it, analytics him and then in every state they are hiring for jobs that are dated jobs, voter file managers, targeting directors, that's, you, the obama campaign will have thousands around the country and i guess hundreds of them are directly interacting with the data everyday. >> host: do you think one of the parties, republicans or the democrats, is more adept at using this technique? or are they all sort of at the same level? >> guest:
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 939 (some duplicates have been removed)